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Lesson Plan Industry Sector
Manufacturing & Product Development

Lesson Plan Originally Created By: Christian Kinsey

Reading a ruler

Part of Unit: Measurement

Lesson Plan Overview / Details

Christian Kinsey

A power point lesson on how to read a ruler.

Lesson Time

Hook
5 Minutes
Pretest
15 - 20 Minutes
Power Point
20 - 30 Minutes
Post test
10 - 15 Minutes

Objectives and Goals

To create an understanding of basic measurement using a ruler.

Activities in this Lesson

  • After the power point and prior to the post test, I ask the students if they have any questions on measurement. I ask the student if they would like to have a free 24 points in my class (ie, they should already know all the answers to this test and it's worth 24 points). Then, I inform them that I am going to give them a test on using a ruler and before I hand it out I ask again if there are any questions on using a ruler.

  • Pretest Assessment

    Assessment of the students prior knowledge of the subject of measuring with a ruler. Before the test is administered I discuss with the students that their projects made in this class do not need to be as precise as their micro SD cards, but the more accurate their projects are the higher quality they will be.

  • Powerpoint Lecture

    Slide 1: Title page

    Slide 2: "What is a Rule?" Three key points of what a ruler is and the three types of rulers.

    Slide 3: Image of ruler divisions, each click of the mouse will show the divisions into each segment (fourth, eighths, sixteenths) Discussion begins with major and minors lines. The taller (major lines) are larger segments of an inch. the smaller lines (minor lines) are the smaller segments of an inch. I also used this to demonstrate that counting the total number between two inch lines will determine the division of the lines (whether we're counting eighths, sixteenths, etc.). I used this to illustrate that 8/16ths could also be 4/8ths, 2/4ths, or 1/2. We also discuss the whether the top number is an even number or not. If so, we can reduce the fraction to the smallest possible fraction. I try to show them the simplest way possible (which ends up being the most number of steps, however it seems to get the job done if they get stuck), by cutting the top and bottom number in half.

    Slide 4: How to read a fractional ruler, used as an assessment of understanding thus far. I may ask for volunteers or call on a student to read a given point.

    Slide 5: How to read a metric ruler, same as fractional

    Note: I use my chalk/whiteboard in conjunction with the power point to help students fully understand the lesson.

    This particular power point corresponds with chapter 5 in our textbook, Modern Metalworking, and is a 3-part series.

  • Posttest Assessment

    After the power point and prior to the post test, I ask the students if they have any questions on measurement. I ask the student if they would like to have a free 24 points in my class (ie, they should already know all the answers to this test and it's worth 24 points). Then, I inform them that I am going to give them a test on using a ruler and before I hand it out I ask again if there are any questions on using a ruler.

Assessment

Assessment Types:
Text provided test

During the hook activity, I engage the students in a question/answer period to check for their understanding of why measurement is so important.

Before the power point presentation, I present the students with a pretest to assess whether there is any prior knowledge of the subject.  

During the power point, I check for understanding once the majority of the lecture has been present (slides 3, 4, & 5).

Lastly, I present a post test to the students to be sure the knowledge has been retained.