Tags

Course Industry Sector
Health Science and Medical Technology

Course Originally Created By: CTE Online

Biotechnology Research and Development Model

Course Overview / Details

Biotechnology is a large scientific field that uses research tools from chemistry and biology to study or solve problems, including human disease. Biotechnologies may be used to study the genetic material of viruses and bacteria to determine whether a disease is caused by particular disease-producing agents. Its techniques are also used to understand how genetic factors contribute to human disease. The information gathered in research can be used to develop diagnostic tests that enable speedy detection and identification of a disease so that an appropriate treatment can be developed. It can also help doctors screen their patients' genomes (all of an organism's genes) for existing diseases or a predisposition for diseases such as cancer.

The standards for the Biotechnology Research and Development Pathway and related courses apply to occupations and functions in biotechnology research and development that apply primarily to human health. The standards specify the knowledge and skills common to occupations in this pathway. Students participating in a strong, industy-driven Biotechnology program can expect to conduct research using bioinformatics theory and methods in areas such as pharmaceuticals, medical technology, biotechnology, computational biology, proteomics, computer information science, biology and medical informatics. Additionally, students may use extended technologies to design databases and develop algorithms for processing and analyzing genomic information, or other biological information pertinent to this field.

Industry Sector, Pathway(s) and Grade Levels

Grades:
9 to 12
Industries and Pathways:
Biotechnology Research and Development, Health Science and Medical Technology

CTE Course Certification Elements

  • Course Level: Capstone
  • CBEDS Course: Biotechnology I
  • CBEDS #: 4245
  • Total Hours: 190
  • Course Length: 2 Semesters
  • State Certified: No
  • Board Approval: Yes
  • Labor Market Demand: High
  • Is this course industry certified?: No
  • Course Type: Career-Technical Preparation
  • CSU/UC Approval: No
O*NET Occupations
Occupation NameOccupation Code
Biomedical Engineers17-2031.00
Biologists19-1020.01
Biochemists and Biophysicists19-1021.00
Microbiologists19-1022.00
Biological Scientists, All Other19-1029.00
Biological Technicians19-4021.00

Related Occupations

Standards

  • California's 2013 CTE Standards: 11
  • California's 2008 CTE Standards: 91
  • California Academic Content Standards: Reinforced: 81
  • California Standards for the Teaching Profession: 2
  • Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS): 7
  • Common Core Standards: Integrated: 1 Reinforced: 37
  • Next Generation Science Standards: 34
  • All Standards
  • Full Details


Competencies / Outcomes

  • Identify the role of the biotechnology industry and product development in curing diseases
  • Discover the fundamentals of mathematical and scientific concepts related to biotechnology
  • Explore major scientific genetic, production, information and data issues in biotechnology
  • Define the principles of major laboratory procedures
  • Explore biotechnology product design/development, procedures, licensure and regulations
  • Identify Ethical, moral, legal, and cultural issues
  • Advise and assist in the application of instrumentation in clinical environments.
  • Analyze new medical procedures to forecast likely outcomes.
  • Conduct research, along with life scientists, chemists, and medical scientists, on the engineering aspects of the biological systems of humans and animals.
  • Develop models or computer simulations of human biobehavioral systems to obtain data for measuring or controlling life processes.
  • Diagnose and interpret bioelectric data, using signal processing techniques.
  • Evaluate the safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of biomedical equipment.
  • Install, adjust, maintain, and/or repair biomedical equipment.
  • Research new materials to be used for products, such as implanted artificial organs.
  • Discuss the different steps in the drug development process.
  • Practice aseptic techniques in a laboratory setting.
  • Prepare LB agar plates and broth for bacterial culture.
  • Streak plates using E. coli.
  • Purify protein using chemicals, centrifugation and column chromatography.
  • Use mathematical concepts to explain and solve problems related to drug development.
  • Analyze results and write answers following the standards in technical writing.
  • Define the term "stem cell."
  • Discuss different types of stem cells.
  • Choose a disease that scientists are working on to find treatment using stem cells.
  • Describe stem cell technology being used to treat an identified disease.
  • Prepare an oral and written report on an identified disease.
  • Explore and or explain job functions as related to epidemiology
  • Identify "Patient Zero"
  • Explore and or explain job functions as related to epidemiology
  • Understand the parts and characteristics of a virus
  • Create a virus model
  • Conduct an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test
  • Analyze ELISA lab results
  • Understand the ever present nature and effects of microorganisms
  • Make agar and pour agar plates
  • Perform an aeroplate exposure
  • Grow microorganisms at various temperatures
  • Write a conclusion to a lab experiment

 

Units in this Course

  • This unit dives deep into a journey that examines basic characteristics of viruses, introduces the concept of index cases and patient zero and elicits the importance of ELISA testing in case identification.  It illuminates human tragedy and the impact of an array of public health epidemics that transformed approaches in disease prevention and intervention commonly used in the 21st Century.

    In addition to the CTE/STEM focus of the unit/project lessons, educators will find academic lessons in History that supplement the primary core area of study.

    The structure of this unit and the materials contained within it were created by Jacqueline Kearns (CTE) and Kristie Banowetz (history) with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by the Course Specialist Sheri Coburn.
     
    CTE
    7 Class Periods
    History
    2 Class Periods
  • This unit is an ambitious undertaking to capture the essence of the drug development process and make the information accessible to high school students. The lessons are linked by  a common scenario taken from the Secrets of the Rainforest  lab by Bio-Rad which is as follows:

    "While hiking through the Andean Rainforest, Tisha obtains medicinal plants, which she brings back to Biotex, a biotechnology company working on a cure for cancer. Biotex scientists determine that the leaves contain a fluorescent green protein (GFP) which may be a possible cure for cancer. The GFP gene from the leaves is inserted into bacterial cells to produce big quantities of GFP protein. The GFP protein will then undergo pre-clinical and clinical trials to hopefully become a new cancer-curing drug in the future."

    The students will assume the role of Tisha and embark in following the different experimental protocols to ultimately produce purified GFP protein. In this unit, the students will learn and practice skills on aseptic techniques, pouring and streaking plates, bacterial transformation and chromatography to synthesize a theoretical treatment for cancer. There are also lessons in Mathematics and English  that complement the CTE lessons that make this unit interestingly cross-curricular.

    Note to the Teacher: The lessons in this unit can still be be used even if you are not using the "Secrets of the Rainforest" lab by Bio-Rad. There are a lot of activities and resources that you can peruse in each lesson that do not need the Bio-Rad lab kit.

    The structure of this unit and the materials contained within it was created by Lilibeth Pinpin (CTE) with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by the Course Specialist Sheri Coburn.
     
     
    15 class periods
    57 Minutes
  • This unit will explore the potential use of stem cells in disease treatment. Lessons in this unit include basic discussions on stem cells, the different types of stem cells, and their contribution and potential for disease treatment. As a result of the sensitive nature of this topic, teachers are encouraged to talk with their adminstrators and reveiw district policies prior to Stem Cell Unit implementation.

    The structure of this unit and the materials contained within it were created by Lilibeth Pinpin (CTE) with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by the Course Specialist Sheri Coburn.
    2 weeks
    10 Class Periods
  • In this unit, students will learn about the ubiquitous nature of microorganisms, the conditions that foster growth of organisms and the sometimes negative effects.

    This unit is intended to be an Interdisciplinary approach to microorganisms. In addition to the CTE/STEM focus of the unit/project lessons, educators will find academic lessons in Biotechnology, Chemistry, and American Literature (ELA) that supplement the primary core area of study.

    • Biotechnology will focus on the omnipresent nature of and technology related to the collection and cultivation of microorganisms
    • Chemistry will focus on the aqueous nature of the solutions and media used to grow organism with particular attention to the equations used to make various solutions
    • American Literature will focus on the global macrocosmic impact of microorganisms in relation to transmission, resistance, morbidity and mortality. as well as examine the societal consequences of bacterial contagion through literary, cultural, philosophical, and political lenses.

    The culminating activity of this Interdisciplinary approach will require students to create artistic mind maps (AMM) that reflect their learning about microbial organisms in each of the three core courses, Biotechnology, Chemistry, and American Literature. The “How to Make an Artistic Mind Map lesson” will be taught in the American Literature class.

    The structure of this unit and the materials contained within it were created by Armando Gonzalez (CTE), Kathleen O'Neill (chemistry) and Susan Carle (ELA) with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by the Course Specialist Sheri Coburn.

    CTE
    7 Class Periods
    Chemistry
    2 - 3 Class Periods
    ELA
    4 Class Periods
  • Students will learn about the structure and function of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Additionally, students will learn about the translation of DNA into biological traits. If the DNA is mutated, the consequences can be good or bad.  Often random mutations, caused by mutagens, result in unexpected outcomes or even harmful consequences.  This unit will focus primarily on radiation as a source of genetic mutation.

    In addition to the CTE/STEM focus of the unit/project lessons, educators will find academic lessons in chemistry and American Literature (ELA) that supplement the primary core area of study.

    • American Literature (ELA) will incorporate the writings of people affected by the dropping of the atomic bomb in Japan during WWII
    • Chemistry will focus on the properties of radioactivity from a atomic point of view

    The structure of this unit and the materials contained within it were created by Armando Gonzalez (CTE), Kathleen O'Neill (chemistry) and Susan Carle (ELA) with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by the Course Specialist Sheri Coburn.

    CTE
    4 Class Periods
    Chemistry
    4 - 5 Class Periods
    ELA
    3 Class Periods
  • In this unit, students will explore the role of the biotechnology industry and biotechnology product development in curing diseases.  Lessons address topics such as researching biotechnology companies, how biotechnology has advanced the making of common food products, and current careers in the field.

    Classroom/Lab
    3 Weeks
  • In this unit, students will review and expand on the fundamentals of mathematical and scientific concepts related to biotechnology. Lessons address such topics as the structure and function of DNA and chromosomes, the central dogma of molecular biology, using cultures, and the basics of lab work.

    Classroom/Lab
    6 Weeks
  • In this unit, students will explore the role of recombinant DNA and genetic engineering, bioprocessing, monoclonal antibody production, separation and purification of biotechnology products, nanotechnology, bioinformatics, genomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in biotechnical product development.  Lessons address such topics as bacterial transformation, recombinant DNA, bioprospecting, and DNA sequencing.

    Classroom/Lab
    10 Weeks
  • In this unit, students will determine the principles of solution preparation, contamination control, measurement and calibration, and emergency laboratory response.  Lessons address such topics as the use of biotechnology lab equipment, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), epidemiology, microscopy, gel electrophoresis, and bacterial isolation.

    Classroom/Lab
    8 Weeks
  • In this unit, students will study biotechnology product design and development, laboratory procedures, product licensure, and the regulatory process for product development and clinical trials.  Lessons address such topics as how pharmaceutical drugs are discovered and produced.

    Classroom/Lab
    3 Weeks
  • In this unit, students will explore the ethical, moral, legal, and cultural issues related to the use of biotechnology research and product development.  Lessons address such topics as the ethics of "invitro meat," fetal tissue transplantation, GMOs as intellectual property, and alternative medicines.

    Classroom/Lab
    3 Weeks