Engineering Design (Grade 11)

by Jeff Lindell

Engineering Design is a concentrator course that offers junior and seniors in high school a practical and theoretical study of the visualization and design techniques used by contemporary product designers, engineers and architects. It is an introduction for any student who would like to pursue a career in engineering, architecture of product development. It is part of an Engineering & Architecture or Manufacturing & Product Development Pathway.

The curriculum includes studies in rapid visualization, aesthetics, materials and processes, presentation techniques, principles of design methodology, elements of art, product development, human factors, prototyping and model-making, freehand sketching, digital rendering, information graphics, and presentation skills.

This course will provide students with a dynamic design experience that enables personal, intellectual, and social growth in the area of communication through effective instruction of a broad knowledge base, discipline oriented skills and progressive methodologies for creative problem solving.

In addition, students learn a methodology for encouraging the creative problem solving process and the attainment of the requisite level of skills needed to express visual ideas with clarity in a peer review critique setting.

Program Information
Course Certification Elements
Course Standards
California's 2013 CTE Standards (91)
Course Competencies / Outcomes

When students leave this class, they will have a basic understanding of how to design and build the ideas they come up with in other parts of the course.

Students will be able to/know/have knowledge in/of:

A. Have industry knowledge, including pay, education requirements, working conditions.

B. How to interview and how to present themselves in an interview.

C. General shop safety procedures

D. Be able to create and give a short presentation

E. how to make simple hand sketched drawing of their ideas

F. How to use various CAD programs to create simple 2D drawings. They will be able to dimension and annotate them appropriately.

G. They will understand the process for designing simple consumer-oriented products

H. Be able to construct a simple model out of wood, plastic, metal and simple electro-mechanical components

I. Be able to design and document (2D CAD, 3D CAD, model) a simple house or building plan

J. Will understand basic electrical concepts and construct simple circuits using common electrical components

K. Create a portfolio of work to show all learning and competencies attained over the course of the class

O*NET descriptions (ONETOnline.org):

ENGINEER (MECHANICAL): Read and interpret blueprints, technical drawings, schematics, or computer-generated reports.  Research, design, evaluate, install, operate, or maintain mechanical products, equipment, systems or processes to meet requirements.  Confer with engineers or other personnel to implement operating procedures, resolve system malfunctions, or provide technical information.  Develop, coordinate, or monitor all aspects of production, including selection of manufacturing methods, fabrication, or operation of product designs.  Investigate equipment failures or difficulties to diagnose faulty operation and recommend remedial actions.

MECHANICAL DRAFTER: Develop detailed design drawings and specifications for mechanical equipment, dies, tools, and controls, using computer-assisted drafting (CAD) equipment.  Produce three-dimensional models, using computer-aided design (CAD) software.  Lay out and draw schematic, orthographic, or angle views to depict functional relationships of components, assemblies, systems, and machines.  Modify and revise designs to correct operating deficiencies or to reduce production problems.  Review and analyze specifications, sketches, drawings, ideas, and related data to assess factors affecting component designs and the procedures and instructions to be followed.

ARCHITECT: Plan and design structures, such as private residences, office buildings, theaters, factories, and other structural property.Prepare scale drawings or architectural designs, using computer-aided design or other tools.  Plan or design structures such as residences, office buildings, theatres, factories, or other structural properties in accordance with environmental, safety, or other regulations.  Direct activities of technicians engaged in preparing drawings or specification documents.  Prepare contract documents for building contractors.  Prepare information regarding design, structure specifications, materials, color, equipment, estimated costs, or construction time.

PRODUCT DESIGNER/INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER: Prepare sketches of ideas, detailed drawings, illustrations, artwork, or blueprints, using drafting instruments, paints and brushes, or computer-aided design equipment.  Confer with engineering, marketing, production, or sales departments, or with customers, to establish and evaluate design concepts for manufactured products.  Modify and refine designs, using working models, to conform with customer specifications, production limitations, or changes in design trends.  Direct and coordinate the fabrication of models or samples and the drafting of working drawings and specification sheets from sketches.  Evaluate feasibility of design ideas, based on factors such as appearance, safety, function, serviceability, budget, production costs/methods, and market characteristics.

MODEL MAKER: Study blueprints, drawings, and sketches to determine material dimensions, required equipment, and operations sequences.  Inspect and test products to verify conformance to specifications, using precision measuring instruments or circuit testers.  Drill, countersink, and ream holes in parts and assemblies for bolts, screws, and other fasteners, using power tools.  Cut, shape, and form metal parts, using lathes, power saws, snips, power brakes and shears, files, and mallets.  Set up and operate machines, such as lathes, drill presses, punch presses, or bandsaws, to fabricate prototypes or models.

Work-based Learning Activities


  • Mock Interview Day: Mock interview where there is 4-6 “jobs” where the students apply and then we have an interview day where local companies come and interview.  This can be paired with internship opportunities so students have a stake in doing well.
  • Small Projects for Students to work on: Talk to partners and see what “small Project” that they completed, but we can provide the students with the same project parameters
  • Industry Field-trips: opportunities to tour local engineering, architectural, manufacturing and other companies and employers
  • Internships: Limited opportunities will be provided to selected students based on academic capability and industry partner needs. Not all students will be selected to participate.


  • Presenting Professionally

Given an applicable real-world scenario (pitch an idea, justify a budget, provide a progress report on a project)

Research the topic

Data-based decision making

Create and deliver a presentation

Get real-time critique from an industry professional (in person, virtually, etc.)

  • Guest Speakers

Invite industry professionals to speak about their job and critique student work


  • Pulse of Industry

See what topics, job areas, themes are important in current industry

Observe, and participate in, industry conferences

Participate in industry outreach/ education events

National Engineers Week (aka "DiscoverE")  https://www.discovere.org/

Course Materials

Textbooks: 

These books can be used whole or in part as resources.

Basic Technical Drawing, Spencer/Dygon/Novak, 8th Edition, Publisher: McGraw Hill Glencoe

Exploring Drafting, Walker/Mathis, 11th Edition, Publisher: The Goodhart-Willcox company, Inc.

The Professional Practice of Architectural Working Drawings, Wakita/Bakhoum/Linde, 5th Edition, Publisher: Wiley

Other equipment required:

  • Shop area with common hand and power tools, including small bench power tools
  • Work benches
  • Air lines for air-powered tools
  • Classroom area for desk for student collaboration
  • 3D printers
  • Printers & scanners
  • Computers with AutoCAD (or similar computer drafting/drawing program), SketchUp, Revit (optional), SolidWorks and other 3D and 2D drawing/modeling software.
Course Units (180 hour course)

Unit 1: Introduction to Engineering and Industrial Safety

Unit Length (Hours): 15

Unit Description:

Students will explore the importance of maintaining personal and occupational safety when working with industrial systems, tools, equipment and hardware.

Students will complete OSHA10 certification and get a lifetime certificate. This is a 10- hour, online course that discusses general safety in a variety of working environments. As students go through the course, they are tested. They cannot go on until they pass each section. Once they complete the course, they are issued a certificate of completion.

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes

Student will have an understanding of the following procedures or skills

  • Emergency Procedures
  • Safety hazard reporting
  • Cyber ethics, cyber safety, and cyber security
  • General shop safety rules and procedures
  • Types of hazardous waste, safety issues, and proper handling and disposal procedures
  • Personal safety practices to and from the job
  • Procedure for reporting a work-related hazard or injury
  • Effects of substance abuse in the workplace
  • Immediate, potential, and hidden hazards
  • Housekeeping tasks related to maintaining a safe work environment
  • Safety test with a perfect score prior to operating equipment
  • Proper safe use of tools and equipment
  • Identify safety color codes and their uses
  • Lock-out and tag-out procedures (LOTO)
  • OSHA10 certification

Unit Assessment

Pass OSHA10 certification test

UNIT 2: Designer Research & Presentation

Unit Length (Hours): 5 hours

Unit Description:  

Students research a famous/important/well-known artist/designer/engineer then present to class. They will teach the class about that person and need to include the following:

  • Main contribution to field
  • What was person trying to do/solve
  • Challenges faced in developing ideas
  • Benefit of ideas at the time and relevance to today
  • How is it used today/effect on today
  • What company uses it today
  • Optional: some sort of quiz created by the students to give to the class. Possibly use Google forms or a similar program.

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes

CTE.EA.C.1.1 Know historical and current events that have relevance to engineering design.

CTE.EA.C.11.2 Give an effective oral presentation of a portfolio.

Unit Assessment

Example of rubric for public presentation used by teacher:

Content of Presentation
Opening Slide: Name, Class, Date, Semester Final (10 points) 10 5 0
At least 5 quality slides (organized visually, use bullet points and other graphic organizers, etc (10 points each).
Content is appropriate, original work from this class 
Closing Slide: sums up in one or 2 sentences what you just presented

Quality of Presentation

Well-prepared and presented: spoke clearly and concisely

Backgrounds not distracting 

Unified presentation: fonts, colors other elements all match

Could be heard: talk loud enough for the whole class to hear

Length of Presentation: Presentation should be 3 ½ to 4 minutes
0-1 minute: 5 points (zero points if you
did not present)
1-2 minutes 10 points
2-3 minutes 20 points
3-4 minutes 30 points
Over 4 minutes 15 points

Assign point values as desired

MISC: in-class hands-on projects

This is several small units that can be spaced through the course as needed.

Unit Length (Hours): 5-10 (various 1 to 2 week projects)

Unit Descriptions: 

A. Popsicle stick bridge: students get about 150-200 sticks, a glue gun and have to span a given space and hold a certain amount of weight

Grading (assign point values): 

  • Does bridge hold given weight for given amount of time? 
  • Deviation from distance (too short or too long)
  • Craftsmanship (how neat is glue job, are structural members straight and aligned or crooked and sloppily assembled?)  

B. "Ship the Chip": students design the smallest, lightest package to ship a potato chip un-harmed.

Grading: 

  • Is chip still in one piece? Deduct points based on how many pieces the chip is in upon arrival. Full credit if chip is whole.
  • size and weight of package is as small and light as possible. Baseline is size and weight of one chip. Assign a point value to that and deduct points for the amount of deviation.

C. Rubberband-powered car: using commonly available materials or a given set of materials students design, build and race a car

Grading: Set up a track of a certain length and width. Cars must stay inside and/or go a certain distance in a certain amount of time.

  • Have students calculate speed (meters per second, and also miles per hour).
  • Extra credit for the fastest car, car that does the farthest
  • OPTIONAL: points for "Coolest Looking Car", "Best Paint Job", etc...
  • Students turn in some sort of report or table of info.

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes

  •  CTE.EA.KPAS.5.1 Identify and ask significant questions that clarify various points of view to solve problems.
  •  CTE.EA.KPAS.5.2 Solve predictable and unpredictable work-related problems using various types of reasoning (inductive, deductive) as appropriate.
  •  CTE.EA.KPAS.5.3 Use systems thinking to analyze how various components interact with each other to produce outcomes in a complex work environment.
  •  CTE.EA.KPAS.5.4 Interpret information and draw conclusions, based on the best analysis, to make informed decisions.
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.1 Build a looks-like, works-like prototype of the model using the appropriate fabrication, manufacturing, or reproduction techniques or technologies. 
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.2 Assess the outcome of the prototype product and analyze any issues that need redesigning or refining related to function, construction, or other factors.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.3 Resolve and/or redesign issues with a prototype.
  • CTE.EA.KPAS.10.3 Construct projects and products specific to the Engineering and Architecture sector requirements and expectations.
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.2 Test the functionality and other features of the prototype against the performance criteria and quality standard and evaluate the results.  ×
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.1 Create a performance criteria and a quality standard to measure and evaluate a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.3 Identify any redesigning or additional corrections required to improve the overall quality, look, and performance of the prototype model.

Unit Assessment

Model grading criteria. Assign point values based on Yes, Mostly, Somewhat, No

  • Sanding: smooth, no scratches or other marks
  • Painting: no drips or runs
  • Assembly: assembled correctly, neatly
  • Craftsmanship: work is done neatly

See each project for more details related to that project.

UNIT 3: Hand Drawing and Sketching

Unit Length (Hours): 15-20

Unit Description: 

Students learn hand-drawing techniques. They use graph paper and straight edges to help, but most drawing is done free-hand:

  • orthographic (3-view) sketches 
  • obliques sketching
  • isometric sketching using isometric graph paper
  • using a ruler: students learn to use a ruler, including engineer's and architect's scales, metric scale, tape measure
  • using calipers: student learn to use and read calipers

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes:

  • CTE.EA.C.3.1 Apply sketching techniques to a variety of architectural models.
  • CTE.EA.C.3.2 Produce proportional two- and three-dimensional sketches and designs.  
  • CTE.EA.C.3.3 Present conceptual ideas, analysis, and design concepts using freehand, graphic, communication techniques.  
  • CTE.EA.C.4.1 Know how the various measurement systems are used in engineering drawings.  
  • CTE.EA.C.4.2 Understand the degree of accuracy necessary for engineering design.  
  • CTE.EA.C.5.1 Understand the concepts and procedures necessary for producing drawings.  
  • CTE.EA.C.5.2 Develop multiview drawings using the orthographic projection process.  
  • CTE.EA.C.5.3 Understand the various techniques for viewing objects.  
  • CTE.EA.C.5.4 Use the concepts of geometric construction in the development of design drawings.  
  • CTE.EA.C.5.5 Apply pictorial drawings derived from orthographic multiview drawings and sketches.

Unit Assessment

Example rubric. Assign point values as desired:

LINES
Correct type in correct place, correct width, weight and consistency
LETTERING
Correct size, weight, all caps, neatly written
CRAFTSMANSHIP
Construction lines minimized, no smudging, views and info (text,
dims, notes, views, etc) lined up, organized, placed on page neatly
OBJECT CONSTRUCTION
Objects drawn correctly (as specified, measured, noted, etc) and
neatly, objects are HAND-DRAWN as much as possible
All info needed (title info, dimensions, text, notes, views, etc)
included

UNIT 4: Drafting/CAD

Unit Length (Hours): 30 hours

Unit Description: 

There are several "sub units" within this lesson. They depend upon the software available and time constraints.

SketchUp assignments: 

  • Students get a short demo on using SketchUp (tutorials included with the program, online, or  teacher-generated)
  • Draw 4 common roof types on simple houses (shed, hip, cross-hip, gable)
  • Computer desk and chair. They need to include a monitor, mouse, keyboard, and other items commonly found on a desk. Teachers can add as needed.

AutoCAD assignments: 

Students bring in a sketch of their room and then draw it in a CAD program. They also can draw a small part (brought in or provided by teacher).

Once this introductory assignment is completed, they move on to a more complex project. 

SolidWorks assignment: 

SolidWorks is one of a few industry-standard 3D modeling programs. This could also be done with Autodesk Fusion 360.

Students use the SolidWize tutorials (website access purchases with SolidWorks) OR tutorials built-in to SolidWorks to be introduced to SolidWorks (or other 3-D modelling program). They then move on to a simple item and then can progress to more complex items. Some students will go faster than others, so have extra work for them to do, preferably more complex parts.

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes:

  • CTE.EA.C.10.1 Describe the processes of lettering and/or text editing.  
  • CTE.EA.C.10.2 Implement standard methods of title block creation and use.  
  • CTE.EA.C.10.3 Develop drawings using notes and specifications.  
  • CTE.EA.C.10.4 Plan, prepare, and interpret drawings and models through traditional drafting or computer-aided design (CAD) techniques.  
  • CTE.EA.C.11.1 Develop a binder or digital portfolio representative of completed work for presentation. 

Unit Assessment

Example rubric. Assign point values as desired:

LINES: Correct type in correct place, proper spacing. Correct width/weight/consistency

LETTERING: Correct size, weight, all caps

ARROWHEADS: Correct size & type
DIMENSIONS: All dimension lines drawn correctly: correct distance from object & text, spaced appropriately, text & arrows in appropriate locations
CRAFTSMANSHIP: Construction lines deleted
Views and info (incl text and dims) lined up, organized, placed on page neatly
OBJECT CONSTRUCTION: Objects drawn correctly (as specified in instructions, as measured, noted, etc.)
Ends of lines, tangents, arcs (where applicable) all meet with no gap or overlap
All needed info included:(title block, dimensions, text, notes, views)
OTHER POINTS: Late, bonus, other

UNIT 5: Product Design

Unit Length (Hours): 10 hours for each project

Unit Description: 

Students design and build various small projects. Adapt for time constraints and budget.

Chair: 

Design a chair in the style of a famous designer. Students need to research a particular designer and then pull out various elements that that designer uses and that represent that designer's style. the end product should look like it was abviously designed by that designer.

Grading: degree to which the design follows the style of chosen designer (completely, mostly, somewhat, not at all), Craftsmanship

Napkin holder:

Students can design AND then build a looks like/works like model of a device that hold napkins.

Grading: based on aesthetics, how securely the napkins are held, how many are held, cost of materials (less is better), craftsmanship (is model made neatly and how close to specs is it?)

Tradeshow display: 

What is the purpose of the space, how people navigate and interact in the space, what draws people in, what is there to do (interactives, sales people, etc.). Students hand draw sketches and possible color them in using markers and/or colored pencils. Alternatively or in addition, they could also use SketchUp to create a 3D view of the space. They could make a small scale model, time permitting.

Grading: short description of purpose that conforms to standard written English (bullet points okay), navigation of space is easily discerned or described with a diagram or other aid, number of interactives is appropriate, quality of sketches and 3D drawings, craftsmanship and accuracy (how close does it match concept drawings?)

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes:

  • CTE.MPD.D.10.1 Create a presentation of the design solution (e.g., product, product line, system design, or service) that effectively communicates its features and benefits.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.8.2 Create a marketing plan for the product that includes target consumer, price, product name, brand, and product positioning in the retail market.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.8.1 Apply research methodologies to identify potential investors or business opportunities to market the product.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.3 Identify any redesigning or additional corrections required to improve the overall quality, look, and performance of the prototype model.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.2 Test the functionality and other features of the prototype against the performance criteria and quality standard and evaluate the results.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.1 Create a performance criteria and a quality standard to measure and evaluate a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.3 Resolve and/or redesign issues with a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.2 Assess the outcome of the prototype product and analyze any issues that need redesigning or refining related to function, construction, or other factors.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.1 Build a looks-like, works-like prototype of the model using the appropriate fabrication, manufacturing, or reproduction techniques or technologies.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.5.3 Communicate and collaborate with fabricators, manufacturers, engineers, technologists, or other industry experts to review requirements and specifications and to validate the design.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.5.2 Recognize the safety issues related to the reliability, functionality, and use of the product.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.5.1 Produce technical drawings and other specifications required for the prototyping or manufacturing of the product.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.4.3 Analyze and assess the strengths and weaknesses in the design, function, ergonomics, features, and benefits and identify possible resolutions for improvement.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.4.2 Identify materials, mechanisms, technologies, and other requirements (e.g., safety, manufacturing, sustainability) the concept may require.  ×
  • CTE.MPD.D.4.1 Create a preliminary design of a product concept utilizing drawing, computer software (graphic or CAD), and/or conceptual model fabrication techniques.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.3.4 Synthesize information and experiment with nontraditional possibilities for innovative design solutions.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.3.3 Assess the environmental impact of the design solution and other sustainability issues and product life cycle considerations.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.3.2 Edit concepts and identify key idea(s) that solve the problem, fulfill a need, or address an opportunity.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.3.1 Apply ideation techniques to explore and produce multiple concepts.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.2.4 Research and identify the user demographic for the product, product line, system design, or service (local, national, global market).  
  • CTE.MPD.D.2.3 Identify potential design areas (e.g., product, product line, system design, or service) that would address the need, problem, or opportunity.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.2.2 Organize information to identify and define an area of opportunity, need, or problem that can be resolved through design.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.2.1 Employ research methodologies, using primary research and electronic reference materials, to gather information relevant to the topic or area of opportunity.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.1.2 Apply and identify the various phases of the product design development process to an existing product, product line, system design, or service.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.1.1 Identify the variations in the product design and development process as it relates to the designing of a product, product line, system design, or service. 

Unit Assessment

See each sub-unit above.

UNIT 6: Model Making

Unit Length (Hours): 20

Unit Description: Students are introduced to small hand tools such as: hobby knife, glue gun, wire cutters, hammer, saw, screwdrivers, wrenches & sockets. They then create a simple model of one of the projects from the Product Design Unit. Once students demonstrate the competency and maturity to use small tools, they move on to learning to use small power tools such as hand drills and bench power tools (drill press, bandsaw, air tools, etc.) to make more complex and involved models.

They incorporate 3D printed parts in addition to fabricated and purchased parts to make various models and prototypes.

At teacher discretion, they can move to more complex and dangerous tools such as a table saw, mill, lathe.

Alternatively, students may build new projects, but must create a sketch of  the proposed project with dimensions, materials, cost, etc. and get teacher approval.

Unit Competencies/ Outcomes:

  • CTE.MPD.D.7.3 Identify any redesigning or additional corrections required to improve the overall quality, look, and performance of the prototype model.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.2 Test the functionality and other features of the prototype against the performance criteria and quality standard and evaluate the results.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.1 Create a performance criteria and a quality standard to measure and evaluate a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.3 Resolve and/or redesign issues with a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.2 Assess the outcome of the prototype product and analyze any issues that need redesigning or refining related to function, construction, or other factors.  

This is the main one, but the others are related and can be addressed

  • CTE.MPD.D.6.1 Build a looks-like, works-like prototype of the model using the appropriate fabrication, manufacturing, or reproduction techniques or technologies.  

Once the model is made, then the students may, time permitting go on to refine and develop their idea further.

  • CTE.MPD.D.5.3 Communicate and collaborate with fabricators, manufacturers, engineers, technologists, or other industry experts to review requirements and specifications and to validate the design.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.5.2 Recognize the safety issues related to the reliability, functionality, and use of the product.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.5.1 Produce technical drawings and other specifications required for the prototyping or manufacturing of the product.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.4.3 Analyze and assess the strengths and weaknesses in the design, function, ergonomics, features, and benefits and identify possible resolutions for improvement.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.4.2 Identify materials, mechanisms, technologies, and other requirements (e.g., safety, manufacturing, sustainability) the concept may require.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.4.1 Create a preliminary design of a product concept utilizing drawing, computer software (graphic or CAD), and/or conceptual model fabrication techniques.  

Unit Assessment

  • Craftsmanship: work is done neatly and carefully
  • Degree model follows original concept (does this look anything like the sketches?). Some minor changes and adjustments are acceptable. Have students note any changes, revisions on the original sketch.
  • Deviation from intended dimensions

UNIT 7: Architectural Design

Unit Length (Hours): 30 hours (5 for research and presentation, 5 for ideation sketches, 10 for design and drawing in CAD, then 10 for making the model)

Unit Description: design a structure in the style of a famous architect or using a particular architectural style. Students could also design a small house to given parameters then create model in SketchUp and/or a physical model made of cardstock/foamcore or other similar materials.

  • Research architectural styles
  • Create sketches of design ideas
  • Present to class
  • Refine ideas
  • Draw in CAD
  • Draw in SketchUp (optional)
  • Build model

Unit Competencies/Outcomes:

  • CTE.EA.C.3.1 Apply sketching techniques to a variety of architectural models.  
  • CTE.EA.C.3.2 Produce proportional two- and three-dimensional sketches and designs.  
  • CTE.EA.C.3.3 Present conceptual ideas, analysis, and design concepts using freehand, graphic, communication techniques.  
  • CTE.EA.A.4.1 Develop a preliminary architectural proposal using CAD software.  
  • CTE.EA.A.8.2 Develop a preliminary proposal for presentation of an architectural design.  
  • CTE.EA.A.8.3 Read and interpret architectural and construction plans, drawings, diagrams, and specifications.  
  • CTE.EA.A.8.4 Develop a complete set of architectural plans and drawings. 

Unit Assessment:

Research: appropriate number of pages of ideas (3-5 ideas on 2-3 pages)

Use presentation, drawing, CAD and model rubrics discussed in previous rubric

UNIT 8: Simple Electricity

Unit Length (Hours): 10

Unit Description: 

Students will build a project that incorporates simple electrical circuit consisting of batteries, lights, switches.

Students start with a lesson in Ohms Law, AC/DC current, series and parallel, identification of components. 

They move on to creating virtual circuits in Tinkercad or other similar programs (such as MultiSim, OrCAD, Constructor, PartSim, etc.) that allow for electrical circuit simulation. This allows them to experiment without causing real damage to real parts. They can use these programs to see what values they should be using for the various components. For example, they can create a simulation of the battery, light and switch circuit and see what values they need to use for the resistor given a certain battery voltage and lamp. This is where they apply Ohm's Law.

Students will construct a circuit composed of a battery, wires, switch, light. The light can be LED or incandescent. Please note resistors will be needed for an LED. They will need to use Ohm's Law to calculate what combination of resistors, LED's and batteries to use in order to successfully make the lamp light. This is where they learn to use a soldering iron. this circuit can be stand alone or incorporated into another project. For example, they could add lights to a rubberband-powered car.

Unit Competencies/Outcomes:

CTE.MPD.D.4.1 Create a preliminary design of a product concept utilizing drawing, computer software (graphic or CAD), and/or conceptual model fabrication techniques.

Unit Assessment:

Create circuit in software and test to see if it works properly. Deduct points for errors based on how they affect circuit. for example, if bulb lights, but is too dim deduct less points that if the bulb blows out because the resistor is the wrong value.

Accurate drawing of circuit with proper symbols.

Construct model of circuit. Does bulb light without being too dim or burning out?

Are soldering joints neat and secure?

UNIT 9: Quarter/Semester Project

This project presents students with an opportunity to actively apply and demonstrate a majority of the skills and competencies for this course through the completion of an authentic, culminating activity, event, or project. 

Unit Length: 35-60 hours

Unit Description: 

Design and product or structure that solves a problem. Students will create a portfolio-worthy package documenting the whole process

RESEARCH AND DESIGN BRIEF PRESENTATION (5 hours): research and identify a problem, write a design brief/problem statement, present to the class

IDEATION: (15 hours): create possible solutions. Use hand sketches and other visual aids (3D computer models, 3D computer sketches, etc.) to show solutions to the problem in a presentation to class and industry professionals.

CRITIQUE (5 hours):  teacher-led, in-class critique. Students use feedback to adjust/modify/refine ideas

CAD: (10 hours): appropriate CAD drawings created. 

MODEL/PROTOTYPE BUILDING (10-15 hours): build a simple model using 3D printer, hand fabrication techniques and other methods

FINAL PRESENTATION & PORTFOLIO (5-10 hours): create and give a final presentation and portfolio. Students are shown to digitize everything using a scanner and camera, how to take photos, and how to place everything in a pdf. They will turn in a 3-ring binder with all documentation printed and also on a flash drive or other digital media. They can also create a trade-show style display of the project to show at a culminating event such as a Senior Show or graduation presentation.

Unit Competency/Outcomes: 

  • CTE.EA.C.11.1 Develop a binder or digital portfolio representative of completed work for presentation.
  • CTE.EA.C.11.2 Give an effective oral presentation of a portfolio.
  • CTE.EA.A.3.2 Produce proportional two- and three-dimensional sketches and designs.  
  • CTE.EA.A.3.3 Present conceptual ideas, analysis, and design concepts using freehand graphic communication techniques.  
  • CTE.EA.A.4.1 Develop a preliminary architectural proposal using CAD software. CTE.MPD.D.7.2 Test the functionality and other features of the prototype against the performance criteria and quality standard and evaluate the results.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.7.1 Create a performance criteria and a quality standard to measure and evaluate a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.3 Resolve and/or redesign issues with a prototype.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.2 Assess the outcome of the prototype product and analyze any issues that need redesigning or refining related to function, construction, or other factors.  
  • CTE.MPD.D.6.1 Build a looks-like, works-like prototype of the model using the appropriate fabrication, manufacturing, or reproduction techniques or technologies.  

Unit Assessment

Use previous assessment rubrics described previously. Break the project up into small pieces and grade each piece separately.

Quarter/semester Project (Course Summative Assessment)

The Quarter/Semester Project provides an opportunity for students to actively apply and demonstrate a majority of the skills and competencies.